2021-10-23 22:44:12 Find the results of "

tennis knocker meaning

" for you

Knocker - definition of knocker by The Free Dictionary

1. (of opponents in a tennis match) to have a short practice before starting on the match ( noun ˈknock-up ). haastig يَتَمرَّن قَبل المُباراه подхвърляне treinar rozehrávat se einspielen varme op κάνω προθέρμανση (στο τένις) entrenar, pelotear.

Knocker | Definition of Knocker by Merriam-Webster

Knocker definition is - one that knocks: such as. How to use knocker in a sentence.

Knock-up | Definition of Knock-up by Merriam-Webster

: a time before a tennis game when players hit the ball to each other in order to practice See the full definition for knock-up in the English Language Learners Dictionary WORD OF THE DAY

Knock-up Meaning | Best 7 Definitions of Knock-up

0. (racket sports, intransitive) To gently hit the ball back and forth before a tennis match, as practice or warm-up, and to gauge the state of the playing surface, lighting, etc. See knock-up. [from 19th c.]

Knock up - definition of knock up by The Free Dictionary

(Tennis) (intr) tennis squash badminton to practise or hit the ball about informally, esp before a match

knock up - Wiktionary

(racket sports, intransitive) To gently hit the ball back and forth before a tennis match, as practice or warm-up, and to gauge the state of the playing surface, lighting, etc. See knock-up. [from 19th c.] The Tennis & Rackets Association - Tournament Rules

What Is Slobberknocker In Football? Definition & Meaning On ...

1. This is a powerful or violent collision between two players in football. The name derives from the idea that spit may fly from a player’s mouth, or slobber, as a result of such a hard hit. In some cases, the term is used to describe an intense game, with especially rough play throughout.

Tommyknockers of the Western Mines – Legends of America

Tommyknockers of the Western Mines. Mining is an ancient profession and along with the back-breaking work and dangers of working in the dark underground, comes century-old superstitions, the most notable being that of the Tommyknockers. These impish, gnome-like men are the Cornish equivalent of Irish leprechauns and English brownies.